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NameBathurst War 1822-1824
DescriptionConflict events including raids, skirmishes, battles and massacres for the Bathurst War 1822-1824
TypeOther
Content Warning
ContributorStephen Gapps
Entries4
Allow ANPS?Yes
Added to System2022-03-29 14:34:06
Updated in System2022-04-06 18:46:00
Subject conflict, massacre, frontier wars, first wiradjuri war
CreatorStephen Gapps
Publisher
Contactstephen.gapps@gmail.com
Citation
DOI
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Date Created (externally)2022-03-29

Eight Mile Swamp Creek

Placename
Eight Mile Swamp Creek
Type
Other

Details

Latitude
-33.58166667
Longitude
149.7677778
Start Date
1824-06-01
End Date
1824-06-01

Description

Extended Data

single_DATE
1 June 1824
PLACE
8-mile Swamp.
ANPS ID
61a1
EVENTS
Three women killed
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
After the attack on Hollingshead on 31 May, according to Grant, consternation among the men on the estate increased, and the Hassalls overseer William Lane and some men arrived equipped for an expedition after the natives. Lane ordered Grant to accompany them as he had so lately seen a party. Some of the other convict stockworkers apparently begged to be allowed arms, that they might go in pursuit of the natives, else they would all be murdered. Of Lanes scratch force, only four of the party had muskets, and the fifth (Henry Castles) could only obtain a sword. They went out to where Hollingshead had been pursued (the southeast direction, close to the main road leading from OConnel-plains) and apparently returned that night after a fruitless expedition, failing to fall in with any of the natives. Grant said that when they were scouring the woods he became separated from the others, so he went to ascertain the safety of the flocks, and the stock-keepers. Then at a place called the 8-mile swamp, 7 miles from the main road, he espied the same tribe he had seen in the morning. Grant called out to Joe, one of the chiefs, who replied in an abusive and insolent way. He called to another man he obviously recognised, Simon, and in reply was answered with a shower of spears. The three womens bodies were later found by Henry Trickey, a crown servant in the employ of merchant and whaling entrepreneur Captain Thomas Raine. Trickey said he lived on his masters estate at the two-mile creek, distant five miles from OConnel-plains, and eighteen from Bathurst, called Rainville. While he was travelling between Sidmouth Valley and the two-mile creek, a trifling distance from the main road to Bathurst, Trickeys attention was arrested by a large quantity of crows, eaglehawks, and other birds of prey. He was then surprised to find the bodies of three black women, on ground called the Government reserve. William Lawson Junior was to write two weeks after the event that the women were killed in sheer frustration at not finding any warriors. He believed Lanes party fell in with a horde of their women and despatched them in return for the men.
EXACT LOCATION
YES. 'The Government Reserve' at 8-mile swamp.
CASUALTIES
Three Wiradyuri women killed
REFERENCES
Gazette, 10 June 1824, p. 2, Gazette, 12 August 1824, p. 2; Salisbury and Gresser, Windradyne of the Wiradjuri, pp. 25, 48. William Lawson Junior to Nelson Lawson, 14 June 1824, in Beard (ed.), Old Ironbark, p. 37.
LEGEND

Sources

TLCMap ID
ta4c1
Created At
2022-03-29 14:35:35
Updated At
2023-11-17 15:40:14

Millah Murrah

Placename
Millah Murrah
Type
Other

Details

Latitude
-33.17333333
Longitude
149.6094444
Start Date
1824-05-25
End Date
1824-05-25

Description

Extended Data

single_DATE
25 May 1824
PLACE
Milla-Murrah
ANPS ID
b4ea
EVENTS
Raid and attack on 'Milla-Murrah'
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
At absentee landlord Samuel Terry's station "Milla-Murrah", George Cheshire and William Lee found "two shepherds and one hut-keeper killed by the natives". The Wiradyjuri warriors had "proceeded to break up and destroy every article of convenience about the place; 12 sheep were killed and eaten at their camp [and] Several other sheep were also killed, and many wounded". The Gazette newspaper later reported "that the natives have in their possession 7 stands of arms, with plenty of ammunition". If "Milla-Murrah" was the "Murdering Hut" it may well have been targetted. Salisbury and Gresser, Windradyne of the Wiradjuri, pp. 22-3. Salisbury and Gresser noted that "Millah-Murrah" was nearby "Tanawarra", a "native cemetery", and that it was also "the location of the Murdering Hut", where it seems poison had been laid out for unsuspecting Wiradyjuri. According to Gresser, it was "nearby" (not on) "Tanawarra", the "native cemetery". Gresser notes that "Mullah-murrah" meant "many eyes".
EXACT LOCATION
YES. Terry's 'Milla-Murrah' station
CASUALTIES
3x convict workers killed
REFERENCES
Reverend William Horton, Wesleyan Missionary Papers, 3 June 1823, ML BT 52, V4, p. 1268; Gazette, 10 June 1824, p. 2; Depositions re bodies of men killed by Aborigines, 29 May 1824, SRNSW, NRS 897, 6065, 4/1799, pp. 5558; Gresser Papers, BDHSMA, pp. 2453; Salisbury and Gresser, Windradyne of the Wiradjuri, pp. 22-3
LEGEND

Sources

TLCMap ID
ta4c2
Created At
2022-03-29 14:35:35
Updated At
2023-11-17 15:40:14

Millpost Creek

Placename
Millpost Creek
Type
Other

Details

Latitude
-33.615
Longitude
149.0677778
Start Date
1824-05-25
End Date
1824-05-25

Description

Extended Data

single_DATE
25 May 1824
PLACE
Mill Post
ANPS ID
ab91
EVENTS
Raid and attack on the 'Mill post'
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
As William Henry Suttor Junior described it, "after this [the Bathurst Massacre], the blacks commenced general depredations". James Lowe was a "shepherd in the employ of a settler up the country" (Richard Lewis). On Tuesday 25 May (Lowe later wrote), he was "very much surprised" on his "return home at sunset" when he "found the hut stripped of everything but a hammock and the hut-keeper killed at the mill". According to Richard Lewis, the owner of the "Mill Post", Lowe and another convict stockworker raced to inform him that they had made the gruesome discovery of "a man lying dead close by the Mills". Tuesday 25 May 1824 was a dark night, with a waning crescent moon. Undoubtedly hastily gathering lanterns, arms and convicts as well as his neighbour, John Tindale (variously Tindall, Tyndall, Tindle) Lewis rushed out to the hut "close by the Mills". He found the dead man as Lowe had reported, as well as "the Hut Robbed of all its contents". On "looking around" he also saw "the footsteps of a great number of Blacks".
EXACT LOCATION
YES. The 'Mill Post' hut
CASUALTIES
1x convict stockworker killed
REFERENCES
Reverend William Horton, Wesleyan Missionary Papers, 3 June 1823, ML BT 52, V4, p. 1268; Deposition re death of James Buckley, suspected murdered by Aborigines, 29 May 1824, SRNSW, NRS 897, 6065, 4/1799, pp. 4750.
LEGEND

Sources

TLCMap ID
ta4c3
Created At
2022-03-29 14:35:35
Updated At
2023-11-17 15:40:14

Wattle Flat

Placename
Wattle Flat
Type
Other

Details

Latitude
-33.13166667
Longitude
149.6927778
Start Date
1824-05-25
End Date
1824-05-25

Description

Extended Data

single_DATE
25 May 1824
PLACE
Warren Gunyah
ANPS ID
12bc0
EVENTS
Raid and attack on 'Warren Gunyah'
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
The next morning (26th), Lewis "proceeded with Tindale to his station, distant about Four Miles". At Tindale"s "Warren-Gunyah" they came across an even more gruesome find. There they "saw the Hut with a quantity of Brush drew around it, and the Hut burnt down". When they looked inside the remains of the hut, they "saw the bodies of two men parts of which had been Burnt away". A more detailed investigation of Tindale's property led to the discovery of another dead man. In the daylight, as Lewis later told Commandant Morisset, "on looking around we found the body of James Buckley one of Mr Tindall's Servants as Corpse about Fifty yards from the Hut".
EXACT LOCATION
YES. John Tindale's 'Warren Gunyah'
CASUALTIES
3x convict stockworkers killed, hut burnt down.
REFERENCES
Deposition re death of James Buckley, suspected murdered by Aborigines, 29 May 1824, SRNSW, NRS 897, 6065, 4/1799, pp. 4750; Gazette, 12 August 1824, p. 2.
LEGEND

Sources

TLCMap ID
ta4c4
Created At
2022-03-29 14:35:35
Updated At
2023-11-17 15:40:14
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